The U.S. Climate Alliance Commits to Maintain Lands as a Net Carbon Sink and Develop Pathways to Act by 2020

U.S. Climate Alliance

CONTACT:  Kristin Igusky | kigusky@usclimatealliance.org

The U.S. Climate Alliance commits to maintain lands as a net carbon sink and develop Pathways to act by 2020

 -- U.S. Climate Alliance issues Natural and Working Lands Challenge to the Global Climate Action Summit on September 12-14, 2018 --

The United States Climate Alliance, a bipartisan coalition of 17 governors committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions consistent with the goals of the Paris Agreement, today issued a Challenge to protect our natural and working lands as a means of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing resilient carbon sinks.  The Challenge will be delivered to the Global Climate Action Summit, to be held in San Francisco on September 12-14, where climate leaders from around the world will convene to take bold climate action:

The natural systems upon which we depend are essential to life and critical for reducing the impacts of climate change on our communities. These systems are also under threat from human activity and climate change. U.S. Climate Alliance States will manage natural and working lands, including forests, farms, rangelands, and wetlands, to be resilient carbon sinks and protect the communities, economies, and ecosystems that depend on them.

The U.S. Climate Alliance recognizes that healthy landscapes sequester carbon and provide significant and cost-effective opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions consistent with the goals of the Paris Agreement. Therefore, the U.S. Climate Alliance States commit to:

-      improve inventory methods for land-based carbon flux;

-      identify best practices to reduce GHG emissions and increase resilient carbon sequestration;

-      advance programs, policies, and incentives to reduce GHG emissions and enhance resilient carbon sequestration;

-      undertake actions that will support a collective, Alliance-wide goal to maintain natural and working lands as a net sink of carbon and protect and increase carbon storage capacity, while balancing near- and long-term sequestration objectives; and

-      integrate priority actions and pathways into state GHG mitigation plans by 2020.

The U.S. Climate Alliance will work in the coming months to identify best practices and policy pathways for protecting and enhancing resilient carbon sinks. U.S. Climate Alliance States will consider and, as appropriate, adopt practices that increase long-term carbon sequestration in forests and forest products; reduce losses from catastrophic wildfire and land-use change; protect existing natural and working lands from conversion; support healthy soils on farms and ranches; restore coastal wetlands and sub-tidal habitats that protect shorelines against sea level rise; restore ecosystems and open space for watershed protection and recreation; and grow the urban forest and other greenspace to improve health and livability. These actions to reduce GHG emissions and increase carbon sequestration will be undertaken in a manner that supports watershed health from source to tap; protects the viability of vital farmland, ranchland and productive forestland; fosters resilient rural economies; restores critical habitat and bolsters ecosystem adaptation to climate change; and offers recreational opportunities across our states.

The Alliance invites all national and subnational jurisdictions, tribes, businesses and other actors to make commitments to reduce GHG emissions and protect and enhance carbon sequestration across all natural and working lands at the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, California this September and thereafter.

 

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US Climate Alliance

                                    

California | Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | Hawaii | Maryland | Massachusetts | Minnesota |

New Jersey | New York | North Carolina | Oregon | Puerto Rico | Rhode Island | Vermont | Virginia | Washington

States Reject Administration’s Attempt to Weaken Clean Power Standards

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  August 21, 2018

CONTACT:  Kristin Igusky | kigusky@usclimatealliance.org

 

States Reject Administration’s Attempt to Weaken Clean Power Standards

 -- States Vow to Continue Opposing Threats to Clean Air, Clean Power --

 Members* of the United States Climate Alliance, a bipartisan coalition of 17 governors committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions consistent with the goals of the Paris Agreement, today issued the following statement on the proposal announced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for a weak replacement for the 2015 Clean Power Plan:

“We strongly reject, and will continue to oppose, the Administration’s proposal to replace the Clean Power Plan with a weak framework that fails to protect our communities from dangerous carbon pollution, and seeks to prop up dirty power plants.

The Administration is ignoring its obligation under the Clean Air Act to provide emission guidelines based upon the best strategies for reducing air pollution from existing sources.  Lack of clear federal guidelines will endanger the health of our people – in fact, the proposal acknowledges the plan will lead up to 1,400 additional premature deaths annually. 

Power plants are already implementing strategies that reduce emissions and drive technological improvements in the electric sector.  As the rest of the world transitions to cleaner energy sources and drives technological innovation, this proposal leaves Americans behind.

In a summer of record temperatures, extreme storms, and raging wildfires following the worst hurricane year on record, this administration is failing to protect Americans from the threat of climate change and turning a blind eye to the economic benefits of renewable energy development and energy efficiency deployment.

We can do better. Collectively, U.S. Climate Alliance states have reduced power sector emissions 30 percent over the last decade while our economies grew faster than the rest of the nation.‎ But many states will continue to require federal regulation to address climate change through meaningful reductions in carbon emissions.  We are resolved to continue reducing pollution from the power sector by supporting clean energy alternatives and other proven strategies.”

 

 

 

 

*California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Minnesota, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Virginia, Washington